Award Descriptions for Keith D. Jensen




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AAPS PharmSci & AAPS PharmSciTech Outstanding Use of Technology Award (2003)

Walter F. Enz Award (2000)

Nagai Foundation Tokyo CRS Graduate Student Award (1998)

American Foundation of Pharmaceutical Education Pre-doctoral Fellowship (1996, 1997, 1998)

NIH Biological Chemistry Training Fellowship (1995)

Higuchi Graduate Fellowship (1994)

Walter D. and Grace Bonner Memorial Award (1993)

University of Utah Liberal Education Study Abroad Scholarship (1992)

Leon Watters Memorial Award (1991, 1992)

University of Utah Chemistry Department Four-year Scholarship (1987)


AAPS PharmSci & AAPS PharmSciTech Outstanding Use of Technology Award

In 2003, I was the first author for the paper awarded the AAPS PharmSci & AAPS PharmSciTech Outstanding Use of Technology Award. The award was based on the best use of technology in a journal article in the journals AAPS PharmSci and AAPS PharmSciTech. The award consisted of a cash award and a presentation at an award program at the 2003 annual AAPS meeting in Salt Lake City, Utah.


Walter F. Enz Award in Pharmaceutics from Pharmacia & Upjohn:

In 2000, I was awarded the Walter F. Enz Award from Pharmacia & Upjohn. The award was based on scholastic and scientific achievment during graduate studies. The award consisted of a cash award and a presentation at an award program (at Pharmacia & Upjohn in Kalamazoo, Michigan on October 23 and 24, 2000). The following short history of the award was provided by Pharmacia.

Dr. Walter Enz was born April 29, 1905. Alter receiving his B.S. in Pharmacy from Purdue in 1927, his M.S. in Pharmaceutical Chemistry from Florida in 1929, he pursued his Ph.D. in Physical Pharmacy at the University of Wisconsin, which he was awarded in 1931. He joined the Upjohn Company July 5, 1932. He rose to the position of Manager of Pharmacy Research prior to his retirement on April 30, 1970.

Dr. Walter E. Enz was a leader of rare quality whose influence is still felt by many scientists who worked under his direction during his long tenure in research management at The Upjohn Company. His special gift was in helping young pharmaceutical scientists develop their full potential and in providing this help in such a way that would build the self-confidence and independence of the scientists.

Dr. Enz liked to say that sound training in basic physical science and mathematics made the best preparation for the practice of pharmaceutical sciences in an industrial setting. Dr. Enz said, "I'm interested in developing products but I'm also interested in developing people." Today his "graduates," people he hired and developed are found in every part of Pharmacia. More importantly, those "graduates" who have left his organization have distinguished themselves in other companies. A very large number of Dr. Enz' graduates have become influential professors in the most prestigious colleges of pharmacy here and abroad.

Dr. Enz is gone now but his memory lives on in those who were privileged to know him. He exerts an influence today in pharmaceutics whenever one of his "graduates" talks to students about the importance of basic training in physical sciences and mathematics. Dr. Enz also influenced pharmaceutics in a lasting way by showing that not only must basic knowledge be applied in the industrial pharmaceutical laboratory, but that basic knowledge should also be generated in this setting. Dr. Enz thought in terms of service to others; his life is a reminder that this belief can lead to lasting accomplishments.

It is with great pride that Pharmacia dedicates this award to his memory.




Nagai Foundation Tokyo CRS Graduate Student Award

In 1998, I was awarded the Nagai Foundation Tokyo CRS Graduate Student Award. The award was based on merit and consisted of a cash award to help defray the costs to attend the CRS annual meeting held in Las Vegas, NV in 1998.


American Foundation of Pharmaceutical Education Pre-doctoral Fellowship:

I first received the American Foundation of Pharmaceutical Education (AFPE) Pre-doctoral Fellowship in 1996. The merit-based award could be renewed twice depending on progress. I received renewals in both 1997 and 1998. The fellowship consisted of a cash award applied toward my graduate stipend. The following description, provided by the AFPE, describes both the AFPE and the fellowship.

The American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education was organized in 1942 to operate in perpetuity as an independent foundation to advance and support pharmaceutical education in the United States. It is the nation's oldest and largest pharmacy foundation.

Annual contributions are provided by research-based pharmaceutical companies, former AFPE Fellows and Scholars, pharmacy and pharmaceutical science associations, foundations, drug store chains, generic drug manufacturers, biotechnology companies, nonprescription drug manufacturers, wholesale drug companies, pharmaceutical advertising firms, and other companies. This generous corporate foundation, and individual giving supports fellowships, scholarships, and grants to help educate the best and brightest students and pharmacy faculty in the pharmaceutical sciences in preparation for distinguished careers in industry and academia. AFPE Fellowships, Scholarships, and Grants are awarded annually in a national competitive selection process.

AFPE provides a vehicle for a diverse group of talented people to gain advanced pharmaceutical education. These students learn state-of-the-art skills and techniques which are of great value to industry and academia and they are prepared to participate effectively in the business and academic environments of pharmacy.

The industry's decision to organize AFPE in 1942, and to continue to support the Foundation for more than 50 years, provides a maximum return on this investment. The contributions of students supported by the Foundation are clear. These are the very best students who will become tomorrow's leaders in the pharmaceutical sciences.




NIH Biological Chemistry Training Fellowship:

In 1995, I was awarded the NIH Biological Chemistry Training Fellowship. The fellowship was awarded on merit and progress during the first year of graduate school. The fellowships were part of a grant from the NIH to encourage interdisciplinary training. The award provided for my stipend, tuition, and health insurance for one year. The fellowships required the recipients to enroll in a broad base of classes providing interdisciplinary training. The NIH grant also provided for semi-annual meetings in which all of the fellowship recipients past and present participated. This allowed us to present our work to each other, broaden our scientific exposure, and foster collaborations.


Higuchi Graduate Fellowship in pharmaceutics:

The Higuchi Graduate Fellowships were funded from a donation by W.I. Higuchi, Distinguished Professor in the Department of Pharmaceutics and Pharmaceutical Chemistry at the University of Utah. These were awarded on scholastic and scientific achievement. The fellowship provided for my stipend and tuition during my first year and the opportunity to participate in a rotation through 3 laboratories during my first year of study. I did rotations with Professors Kopecek [Report (235 KB PDF file)], Kim, and Ruffner [Report (258 KB PDF file)] before choosing Dr. Kopecek as my advisor.


Walter D. and Grace Bonner Memorial Award in chemistry

The Walter D. and Grace Bonner Memorial Award was given to outstanding graduating Seniors in chemsitry at the University of Utah based on their academic record. It consisted of a cash award. The fund was established as a memorial to Dr. and Mrs. Walter D. Bonner. Dr. Bonner was the former chair of the Chemistry Department.


University of Utah Liberal Education Study Abroad Scholarship:

The University of Utah Liberal Education Study Abroad Scholarship was designed to encourage students to participate in study abroad programs. The scholarship provided a merit-based cash award for students who would earn at least 9 hours of credit for the fulfillment the Liberal Education requirement. I was awarded the University of Utah Liberal Education Study Abroad Scholarship in 1992 when I participated in a study abroad program at the Carolo Wilhelmina Technische Universitšt in Braunschweig, Germany. While at the Technische Universitšt, I studied the German language, which I had started at the Univ. of Utah, and German culture. Upon returning, I finished the requirements for a minor in German at the Univ. of Utah.


Leon L. Watters Memorial Award in chemistry

The Leon L. Watters Memorial Award was given in recognition of outstanding scholastic achievement in chemistry and allied courses and promise of success in chemistry. It consisted of a cash award. I recieved this award in 1991 and again in 1992.


University of Utah Chemistry Department Four-year Scholarship:

As an entering Freshman, I was awarded the University of Utah Chemistry Department Four-year Scholarship. The scholarship was awarded on merit. The scholarship provided for tuition for four years as well as a small cash award and the opportunity to participate in undergraduate research. I choose to work with the late J. Calvin Giddings, Distinguished Professor of Chemistry. Dr. Giddings invented field-flow fractionation in 1965 and contintued to modify and develop it into a highly sensitive separation method capible of revealing hard to obtain sample information. Working with Dr. Giddings was the best and most defining aspect of my undergraduate career, teaching me countless things about research, graduate studies, presenations, and publications.





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